Teaching is not about me 

Teaching is not about me 

Something has occurred to me recently, something that should have occurred to me years ago, and it’s that the teaching sessions I deliver are not about me. It may sound terribly self absorbed (it’s a flaw of mine) but for the last near 20 years I’ve been worrying about what I was going to say and how I was going to say it. Wrong! God what a vain and stupid cow I am. It’s about what they are going to learn and how they are going to learn it. 

Recently I’ve learnt the basics of how to teach and I can’t stop proselytising away about learning objectives and types of learners. It culminated in a session this afternoon (impromtu) in endoscopy when the nurses said at the end “that was great, what a brilliant teaching session, I’ve learned a lot too and how you did it was so clever”. I could not have been happier. 

I had one student and then an hour later I had two. I had decided the learning objectives for student 1 when he came in and we were making progress through the three objectives and then  when student 2 came I made student 1 teach student 2 what he’d learned; thus consolidating 1’s learning and freeing me up to do the paperwork.  Rather than me getting in a pickle about the pharmacology of buscopan, a distant and vague memory, we focused on just a few things and we did it well and when we finished they had learned something. It’s genius, and of course very obvious to people who know how. I’ve recently been criticised for my affection for the University’s “Teachometer” (not it’s actual name), as time spent teaching is not an measure of quality. I’m now on a one woman mission to make my teaching time quality time. 

Freeing myself from the terrible sense of fear that I might not know enough about the subject and therefore not be worthy of delivering teaching has been a long time coming. We filmed some of  a course we delivered locally and part of it involved me delivering a small group session. I have realised several things; I have a weird teacher voice, much quieter and softer than my usual speaking voice, I am not as fat as I think I am and nobody knew when I got the order wrong. 

In my perfectionist mind I had planned on saying things in a particular order but on the day, I didn’t, and despite my heart rate rising to 180 and feeling distraught at my failure, it was not at all apparent and didn’t seem like it was a disaster at all. This has helped me considerably to relax and enjoy my teaching because nobody but me knows what I am going to say and when. 

The observation that I get a gentler voice is not because teaching is anything like parenting, Mummy Me these days is a harassed and often shouting individual with little patience. I think it’s because I feel nervous and unsure, although fortuitously this is not how I come across and if I can project a bit more and change the tone back to my normal then it will seem more genuine. 

Anyway, now that I know that it isn’t about me I’m much less likely to get myself in a state mid lecture thinking I’ve ruined everything if I cock up my running order. Having the focus on them rather than me, so simple and so obvious, maybe that’s why nobody told me? 

I have lots of teaching to do this week and now that I am combining enthusiasm with some knowledge, theory and skills it might just be good quality. Can’t wait for the feedback/happyforms…but are they the right measure? Probably not but I’m excited nonetheless! 

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